Days in the life

Days in the life

© Aurélien Bacquet

Pour les francophones, scrollez un peu et vous serez récompensés.

Alarm clock goes off at 6:15 am. Running a little late already. My board sits next to the front door, a worn out 3/2 draped over it, still slightly wet from yesterday’s morning session. It’s not dark anymore – “dammit,” I think to myself “should of got up at 5:30” – I don’t have much time. I grab my shit and run out the door.

On the road by 6:30 and traffic is starting to suck. Luckily heading to Ventura from LA at this hour is against rush hour – something that will change soon as more and more plebeians seek out their mini American dream in the beauty that is the Golden State. Steadily hitting 80 MPH (128kph for the rest of you) I make it to C-Street by 7:45am. The fall swells have started throwing long period swells at this stretch of coast. Once in the parking lot I spot an empty wave at the bottom of the point. A reeling right about head high, a wave you’ve surely seen in many a Dane Reynolds clip.

2 hours slip by quickly all the while more and more locals as well as plenty of unemployed surfers with the means to surf on a Wednesday, join in on the session. My lie about going to the dentist this morning will hold up if I don’t forget to wipe off the make-up like affect of the sunscreen stick I’ve been using. Also have to park the car a block away from the office to make sure my boards stay out of sight from any suspecting co-workers.

I change out of my wetsuit and into a pair of shorts and a t-shirt. It’s late September but feels like mid summer. Sitting in bumper to bumper traffic on a SoCal freeway would be a lot shittier if I hadn’t gotten to slide across a few 4-5 ft nuggets. Well at least I got air conditioning.

© Ryan Bonvouloir

__________________________________________

5:30 am – fuck it’s cold. A text from Guillaume hits my phone. “Where are you?” I can hear his accent through the SMS. “J ‘arrive bro” I shoot back. My board sits by my apartment door. My bone dry 4/3 hanging over it. I haven’t surfed in at least 3 weeks. I put on layer after layer, grab my gear and head for the Paris metro. It’s late November and a solid west swell is slamming into Europe – funnelling overhead surf through to the French side of the English Channel, about a 2 hour drive north of the city of lights. It’s still pitch black outside as I head out the door. The few Parisians I see on the street as I make my way to the subway – known simply as the metro here- stare, point and jab at me as they stumble home from a late night on the town.

Carrying a board bag, wetsuit and a backpack onto the Paris metro is exactly like it sounds – a fucking nightmare. But I diligently repeat the process month after month, if I’m lucky. This particular trip is the closest to my home as it sits in the English Channel, a place that rarely sees any surf of substance due to it being tucked below and away from the open ocean. Water temps are in the mid 40s Fahrenheit about 8 degrees Celsius. A very good 4/3 or even a 5/4 is required, along with a hood, gloves and 5mm booties. After living in France for the past 2 years I’ve gained a ton of respect for those that can rip in ice-cold conditions. The weight of all that extra neoprene alone requires surfing a bigger board paired with the lack of flexibility and the scenario is akin to skateboarding in a hazmat suit.

© Aurélien Bacquet

Sunrise is around 8 am this time of year, allowing us to be in the parking lot as first light hits. However, it is not first light that allows us to surf this area it is the tide, everything here depends on the tides. This fact dawns on me as I look to the “break” which resembles a tranquil cove set against a massive white arching-cliff and no waves. “Where’s the wave at?” I ask. “Looks like we will have to wait maybe an hour” Guillaume replies.

Sure as shit, about 30 minutes later some local groms emerge, boards in tow as the first signs of liquid life begin to show. I see a small left breaking just below a magnificent arc of sheer, white rock. I have a hard time measuring wave size against such a towering backdrop but as the tide continues to drop from its apex, a set breaks, exposing the true potential.

We quickly suit up, bare feet aching numb from the freezing asphalt. Albeit very cold, the sun is out so it’s 4/3s and 5mm booties today. Gloves go on dead last as trying to do anything meaningful in them is absolutely pointless. The waves are slightly overhead, mostly lefts with a steep take off to a soft shoulder. We surf for about 2 hours just before the tide becomes too low and shuts the spot down.

© Aurélien Bacquet

Walking up the rocky beach I look back at the wave, thinking of my life back in Los Angeles. The differences in just getting into the water is so much more work here. I had taken my surfing life for granted while living at home and was now learning the ropes of my new reality.

The preparation and dedication to surfing isn’t even a factor, it is just a way of life. I mean to say that it’s not something you ever feel you have to do, like waking up in the morning and hitting the gym before work. Nothing about surfing for me is ever a downer; the extra planning and literal dissecting of swell charts excite me as if that is the natural state of being. It may take a whole different approach to surfing here but the feeling remains the same. It is truly only something a surfer can know. The thrill, the love, the camaraderie exist as it always has through the simple act of sliding on a wave. I’m more stoked than ever to consider myself a surfer, even if I live exactly 123.65 miles (199 k’s) from the nearest beach.

© Aurélien Bacquet

Le réveil sonne à 6h15. J’ai déjà un peu de retard. Ma planche est posée à côté de la porte d’entrée, une vieille 3/2mm drapée par-dessus, encore un peu mouillée de la session d’hier matin. Il ne fait déjà plus nuit – “bordel”, je me dis “j’aurais dû me lever à 5h30” – je n’ai pas beaucoup de temps devant moi. J’attrape mes affaires et je sors en vitesse.

Il n’est que 6h30 et les bouchons commencent déjà. Heureusement, peu de gens sortent de Los Angeles pour aller à Ventura à cette heure – c’est quelque chose qui changera bientôt vu que de plus en plus de monde cherche le mini rêve américain dans le superbe Golden State. Je fonce à 80 mi/h (128 km/h pour les autres) et j’arrive à C-Street à 7h45. Les houles d’automne ont commencé à produire des houles longues sur cette partie de la côte. Une fois dans le parking, j’aperçois une vague sans personne en bas de la pointe. Une vague que vous avez sûrement vue dans de nombreux clips de Dane Reynolds.

2 heures s’écoulent rapidement et de plus en plus de locaux ainsi que de nombreux surfeurs au chômage ayant les moyens de surfer un mercredi arrivent sur le spot. Mon histoire de rendez-vous chez le dentiste ce matin tiendra la route si je n’oublie pas d’enlever l’écran total que j’ai le visage. Je dois aussi garer la voiture à un pâté de maisons du bureau pour m’assurer que mes planches restent hors de vue de tout collègue suspect.

Je retire ma combi et j’enfile un short et un t-shirt. C’est fin septembre, mais on se croirait au milieu de l’été. Rester bloquer dans les bouchons d’une autoroute californienne serait beaucoup plus chiant si je n’avais pas réussi à glisser sur quelques pépites de 4-5 pieds. Au moins, j’ai la clim.

© Aurélien Bacquet

__________________________________________

5h30 du matin, putain, il fait froid. Un texto de Guillaume arrive sur mon téléphone. “Where are you?” J’entends son accent par SMS. “J’arrive bro”, je riposte. Ma planche est près de la porte de l’appartement. Ma 4/3 toute sèche qui pend juste au-dessus. Je n’ai pas surfé depuis au moins 3 semaines. J’enfile couche après couche, je prends mon matos et je me dirige vers le métro. On est fin novembre, une grosse houle d’ouest s’abat sur l’Europe et les vagues rentrent dans la Manche, à environ 2 heures de route au nord de la ville des lumières. Il fait encore nuit noire dehors quand je sors. Les quelques Parisiens que je croise en allant vers le métro me fixent, me montrent du doigt et se foutent de ma gueule alors qu’ils rentrent de soirée.

Porter un boardbag, une combinaison et un sac à dos dans le métro parisien est exactement comme ça en a l’air : un putain de cauchemar. Mais je répète diligemment l’opération mois après mois, si j’ai de la chance. Ce spot est le plus proche de chez moi, car il est situé dans la Manche, un bout de mer qui reçoit rarement de bonnes vagues parce qu’il est coincé entre l’Angleterre et la Normandie, loin du grand large. La température de l’eau est d’environ 8 degrés Celsius (dans les 40 degrés Fahrenheit). Une bonne 4/3mm ou même une 5/4mm est obligatoire, avec une cagoule, des gants et d’épais chaussons de 5mm. Après avoir vécu en France ces 2 dernières années, j’ai beaucoup plus de respect pour ceux qui peuvent bien surfer dans des conditions glaciales. Le poids de tout ce néoprène à lui seul t’oblige à surfer une planche plus grande. Rajoute à ça le manque de flexibilité et la sensation est la même que faire du skate en combinaison HAZMAT.

Le soleil se lève vers 8 h à cette période de l’année, ce qui nous permet d’arriver sur le parking dès les premières lueurs de l’aube. Mais ce n’est pas parce qu’il fait jour que nous pouvons déjà aller à l’eau. Ici, tout dépend des marées. Je me rappelle de ça en contemplant le plan d’eau qui ressemble à une crique tranquille surplombée par une énorme falaise voûtée blanche et sans vagues. “Où est la vague ?” Je demande. “On dirait qu’il va falloir attendre peut-être une heure”, répond Guillaume.

Bien sûr, une trentaine de minutes plus tard, des groms locaux commencent à arriver la planche sous le bras alors que les premières ondes commencent à se montrer. Je vois une petite gauche qui se brise juste en dessous de l’arche. J’ai du mal à mesurer la taille des vagues sur un fond aussi imposant, mais alors que la marée continue de descendre, une série déferle, exposant le vrai potentiel du spot.

© Aurélien Bacquet

On s’habille rapidement, nos pieds nus engourdis par le bitume gelé. Bien qu’il fasse très froid, le soleil est là, mais il faut quand même une 4/3mm et 5mm sur les pieds aujourd’hui. On enfile les gants en derniers, car il est absolument inutile d’essayer de faire quoi que ce soit en les portant. Les vagues sont un peu overhead, des gauches pour la plupart, avec un take off abrupt et une épaule un peu molle. Nous surfons pendant environ 2 heures juste avant que la marée ne devienne trop basse et que le spot ne s’arrête de fonctionner.

En remontant la plage rocheuse, je regarde la vague en pensant à ma vie à Los Angeles. C’est beaucoup plus compliqué ici de simplement se mettre à l’eau. Je considérais ça comme acquis quand je vivais en Californie et j’apprenais maintenant les ficelles de ma nouvelle réalité.

La préparation et le dévouement au surf est un mode de vie. Je veux dire que ce n’est pas quelque chose qu’on se sent obligé de faire, comme se réveiller le matin et faire du sport avant le travail. Absolument rien dans le surf n’est déprimant pour moi ; l’organisation et la dissection des cartes océaniques m’excitent comme si c’était l’état naturel de l’être. L’approche du surf peut être totalement différente ici, mais la sensation reste la même. C’est vraiment quelque chose que seul un surfeur peut connaître. Le frisson, l’amour, la camaraderie existent comme ça l’a toujours été par le simple fait de glisser sur une vague. Je suis plus heureux que jamais de me considérer comme un surfeur, même si je vis exactement à 123,65 milles (199 k’s) de la plage la plus proche.

© Aurélien Bacquet
© Aurélien Bacquet